Is Hair Pulling an Addiction? The Misconceptions and Truths About Trichotillomania

Is Hair Pulling an Addiction? The Misconceptions and Truths About Trichotillomania

November 09, 2021

Is Hair Pulling an Addiction? The Misconceptions and Truths About Trichotillomania

Hair pulling is often misconceived as an addiction or self-harm, but it is actually a chronic health condition known as Trichotillomania. For people who suffer from this disorder, hair pulling can be a way to cope with stress or other mental health issues. It can be difficult to live with Trichotillomania, as there are many misconceptions about the disorder. In this article, we will explore the truths and myths about Trichotillomania.

  1. Trichotillomania is not an addiction.

While hair pulling may provide a sense of relief or pleasure for people with Trichotillomania, it is not an addiction in the traditional sense. People with Trichotillomania do not compulsively pull their hair out in order to reach an altered state of consciousness, they do it because they have an uncontrollable urge to do so.

  1. Trichotillomania is its own disorder.

While hair pulling may be symptomatic of another mental health condition, Trichotillomania is actually considered its own disorder. People with Trichotillomania experience a strong urge to pull their hair out, and the act of hair pulling can become compulsive and addictive.

This disorder can cause a great deal of distress and impairment in someone’s life, which is why it is classified as a mental disorder. Trichotillomania can affect all areas of someone’s life, including their social, occupational, and academic functioning.

  1. Trichotillomania is not a rare disorder.

While Trichotillomania may be lesser known than other mental health conditions, it is actually quite common. It is estimated that between 3.5% of the population suffers from this disorder, which means that there are potentially millions of people who struggle with it.

This disorder can affect people of all ages, genders, and races, so it is important to be aware of the signs and symptoms. If you or someone you know seems to exhibit compulsive hair-pulling behavior, it is important to seek professional help.

  1. Trichotillomania is manageable.

There is no cure for trichotillomania, but there are ways to manage the symptoms and urges to pull your hair out. The most effective treatment options include cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and habit reversal training (HRT). These treatments focus on helping people learn new coping strategies for dealing with stress and other triggers that may cause them to pull their hair out.

If you or someone you know suffers from trichotillomania, it is important not to feel shame about your symptoms; instead, seek professional help so that they can learn how best to manage the disorder in order to live life more fully.

  1. Trichotillomania is not a death sentence.

While Trichotillomania can be a debilitating disorder, it is not life-threatening. People with Trichotillomania can lead healthy and productive lives if they receive the right treatment.

With the help of therapy and self-help strategies, people with trichotillomania can learn to manage their urges and live fulfilling lives. Trichotillomania should not be seen as a death sentence but rather as a condition that can be managed and overcome with the right treatment.

  1. Trichotillomania is not a choice.

Most people with trichotillomania have an underlying mental health condition such as depression or anxiety. They might be heavily intertwined with your hair-pulling, as trichotillomania is a hard condition to manage, but they are separate mental health conditions and each have different treatment methods. (Although some might overlap) Heightened depression or anxiety can also be a trigger, and can make someone more likely to engage in compulsive behaviors like pulling their hair out.

  1. Trichotillomania is not a sign of weakness.

Many people with trichotillomania feel ashamed and embarrassed about their symptoms and may view themselves as weak or defective for having this disorder. However, it is important to remember that Trichotillomania is a real mental health condition that affects millions of people worldwide.

  1. Trichotillomania is not a reflection of someone's character.

People with trichotillomania are not lazy, dirty, or careless; in fact, they often go to great lengths to hide their symptoms from others. Trichotillomania is a real mental health condition that should be treated with respect and understanding.

If you or someone you know is struggling with trichotillomania, please seek professional help. There are treatments available that can help manage the symptoms and urges to pull your hair out. With the right treatment, it is possible to live a fulfilling and productive life despite this disorder. Remember, you are not alone! Millions of people around the world suffer from trichotillomania and other body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRBs).

Looking to Cure Trichotillomania? Try Keen2 Smart Bracelet:

Trichotillomania is a disorder that involves the compulsive urge to pull out one's hair. While there is no cure for trichotillomania, there are tools that can help manage the symptoms and urges to pull out hair. Keen2 Smart Bracelet may be able to help those looking to overcome their trichotillomania.

Keen2 Smart Bracelet is a wearable device that monitors and tracks your daily activities, including the amount of time you spend pulling out your hair. You train it to detect your specific behavior, and when the bracelet detects that you’re doing that behavior, it will prompt you to redirect restless hands with a subtle vibration. The bracelet sends all of this data to an app on your phone, which then provides you with insights and feedback about your behavior. 

Final Thoughts

Trichotillomania is a real mental health condition that affects millions of people worldwide. If you or someone you know is struggling with trichotillomania, please seek professional help. There are treatments available that can help manage the symptoms and urges to pull your hair out. With the right treatment, it is completely possible to live a fulfilling life despite this disorder.

photo from pexels.com



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